Program

Photo credit: Natasha Gilbert

March 19, Tuesday

5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Evening Reception at the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science Good Life Garden

Welcome to University of California, Davis (Mary Delany, Interim Dean, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California, Davis)

March 20, Wednesday

I. Setting the Stage for Climate Change Challenges: How should recent climate research affect agricultural management and development?

8:45 am – 10:30 am: Opening plenary session (Moderator:  Lovell Jarvis, UC, Davis), Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts

  • Lovell Jarvis, Chair, Conference Organizing Committee (UC Davis):  Introduction to the Conference
  • Linda Katehi (Chancellor, UC Davis): Welcome to UC Davis
  • Thomas Vilsack (Secretary of Agriculture, USDA): Climate Change and US Agriculture (Video presentation)
  • Mary Nichols (Chair, California Air Resources Board): California’s pioneering climate change policies
  • Erik Fernandes (Adviser, Agriculture and Rural Development, The World Bank):  Overview of World Bank achievements, plans and initiatives for climate change and its interface with science partners
  • Leslie Lipper (Senior Environmental Economist/ EPIC Programme Director): FAO work to support CSA: bridging the research/policy divide
  • Tina Monica Joemat-Pettersson (Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, South Africa): Climate change and small-holder farms in South Africa (Video presentation)

10:30 am – 11:00 am: Break

11:00 am – 12:30 pm: Plenary session  (Moderator: Lovell Jarvis, UC Davis)

Crucial science questions for climate change: Challenges, investments and actions

12:30 pm – 2:00 pm: Lunch

II. Theme 1. Farm and Food System Issues: Sustainable intensification, agroecosystem management and food systems

2:00 pm – 3:30 pm: Plenary session  (Moderator: TBD),  Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts

How has global agriculture responded since the Wageningen conference? What policies and programs are being implemented and what is urgently needed?  Three 15-20 minute talks, followed by moderated discussion.

  • Sonja Vermeulen (University of Copenhagen/CCAFS): Climate change and food systems in a developing country context, including farm level options for sustainable intensification and their location specificity, with emphasis on the CGIAR and interactions with other institutions
  • Karen Ross (Secretary, California Department of Food and Agriculture): California climate change programs: legislation, policy priorities, and new research questions related to energy, mitigation and adaptation, and implementation

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm: Break

III. Parallel Science Session on Research Gaps: Theme 1

4:00 pm – 5:30 pm: Parallel science session, UC Davis Conference Center

These sessions will identify and analyze recent scientific discoveries relevant for climate smart agriculture, science gaps that should be filled, interdisciplinary interactions and linking science to implementation. Each session includes three 15-20 minute presentations, followed by panel discussion. A follow-up session on the afternoon of day 2 will focus on new directions, research initiatives and impacts.

1) Crop physiology and genetics under climate change:  implications for breeding and dissemination strategies (Session Co-Leaders: Matthew Reynolds (CIMMYT Global Wheat Program); Arnold Bloom (UC Davis Plant Sciences))

2) Livestock management, animal health and policies for climate change impacts on disease (Session Co-Leaders: William Sischo MD (Washington State University); Ermias Kebreab (UC Davis Animal Sciences))

3) Nitrogen management: balancing agricultural growth, GHG accounting, GHG mitigation + adaptation (Session Co-Leaders: Jerry Hatfield (USDA ARS); William Horwath (UC Davis Land, Air and Water Resources))

4) Farmer decision making under climate change and barriers to the adoption of climate smart agriculture practices (Session Co-Leaders: Lini Wollenberg (University of Vermont/CCAFS); Mark Lubell (UC Davis Environmental Science and Policy))

5) Water management related to food and fisheries systems under climate change: implementing strategies, technologies and institutions (Session Co-Leaders: Colin Chartres (IWMI); Sam Sandoval (UC Davis Land, Air and Water Resources))

6) Climate risk management (financial mechanisms, insurance, or climate services for farmers) (Session Co-Leaders: Andrea Cattaneo (FAO, Climate Smart Agriculture Project); Michael Carter (UC Davis Agricultural and Resource Economics))

IV. Summaries of Parallel Science Sessions for Theme 1

5:45 pm – 6:15 pm: Plenary session (Moderator: Louise Jackson, UC Davis), Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts

In preparation for the conference declaration, very brief (2-3 min) summaries of the research scope and gaps from the co-leader of each parallel science session in Theme 1.

6:15 pm – 7:00 pm: Reception

7:00 pm - 9:00 pm:  Dinner and Dinner Speaker

  • Ben Santer (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory): How do we know it’s us?

March 21, Thursday

V. Theme 2. Landscape and Regional Issues: Land use, ecosystem services and regional resilience

9:00 am – 10:30 am: Plenary session  (Moderator: Christine Negra, EcoAgriculture Partners), Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts

Landscape-scale research on food security, natural resources, policy and governance to achieve agricultural resilience to climate change. Three 15-20 minute talks, followed by moderated discussion.

  • Andy Jarvis (CIAT/CCAFS): Evaluation approaches and tools for assessing agricultural vulnerability/resilience to climate change in regional contexts (assessments, multi-scale models, place-based analysis with stakeholders)

10:30 am – 11:00 am: Break

VI. Parallel Science Sessions on Research Gaps: Theme 2

11:00 am – 12:30 pm:Parallel science session, UC Davis Conference Center

These sessions will identify and analyze recent scientific discoveries relevant for climate smart agriculture, science gaps that should be filled, interdisciplinary interactions and linking science to implementation. Each session includes three 15-20 minute presentations, followed by panel discussion. A follow-up session on the afternoon of day 2 will focus on new directions, research initiatives and impacts.

7) Climate change and food security: adaptation and uncertainty (Session Co-Leaders: Rik Leemans (Wageningen University); Robert Hijmans (UC Davis Environmental Science and Policy)

8) Soil quality, organic matter and water use across landscapes: achieving multifunctionality through adaptation, mitigation and GHG accounting (Session Co-Leaders: Pablo Tittonell (Wageningen University); Kerri Steenwerth (UC Davis Viticulture and Enology/USDA ARS))

9) Energy and biofuels: production and technologies to cut emissions without interfering with food production (Session Co-Leaders: Siwa Msangi (IFPRI); Bryan Jenkins (UC Davis Bio and Agricultural Engineering))

10) Managing and conserving biodiversity to increase ecosystem services and resilience to climate change (e.g. REDD+ in mosaics of forest+cultivated systems, agroforestry, genetic resources) (Session Co-Leaders: Ravi Prabhu (World Agroforestry); Louise Jackson (UC Davis Land, Air and Water Resources))

  • Ravi Prabhu (World Agroforestry)
  • John Parrotta (US Forest Service)
  • Ingrid Visseren-Hamakers (Wageningen University)

11) Rural-urban connections that promote climate change resilience for agriculture (e.g. rural outmigration, urban and peri-urban agriculture, avoiding urban sprawl into valuable farmlands) (Session Co-Leaders: Kevin Henry (CARE/Where the Rain Falls); Steve Wheeler (UC Davis Landscape Architecture))

12) Metrics for vulnerability assessment, mitigation, adaptation, food security and ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes (Session Co-Leaders: Cheryl Palm (Earth Institute, Columbia University); Mike Springborn (UC Davis Environmental Science and Policy))

12:30 pm – 2:00 pm: Lunch

VII. Theme 3. Integrative and Transformative Institutional and Policy Issues: Bridging across scales

2:00 pm – 3:30 pm: Plenary session (Moderator: Dennis Garrity, UN Drylands Ambassador and former Director-General, World Agroforestry), Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts 

Transformative changes needed to achieve food security, natural resource protection and development given the uncertainty of climate change, how science and multi-scale programs will support adaptive strategies for food security and ecosystem service goals, and be incorporated into policy.  Three 15-20 minute talks, (Moderator TBD)

  • Frank Mitloehner (UC Davis): Extension and participatory research for engaging farmers and other stakeholders in building awareness for climate change and agriculture; Examples of linking farmers to climate information to improve agroecosystem management/food systems

3:30 pm - 4:00 pm: Break

VIII. Follow-Up Parallel Science Sessions on Priorities for Research Initiatives and Impacts: Themes 1 and 2

4:00 pm – 5:30 pm: Parallel science session, UC Davis Conference Center and Buehler Alumni and Visitors Center

Follow-up analysis and synthesis of 12 parallel science topics to address scientific priorities to develop transformative approaches to policy and action

Deliverables include a 2-3 page document from each of the 12 sessions, each with a background statement on the challenges of the topic, the research gaps identified, and a set of research initiatives and impacts that have both short-term and long-term horizons

IX. Evening Plenary Presentation

5:45 pm – 6:15 pm: Plenary session (Introduction: Mary Delany, Interim Dean, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, UC Davis), Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts

  • Catherine Woteki (Undersecretary, USDA)

X. Summaries of Parallel Science Sessions for Theme 2

6:15 pm – 6:45 pm: Plenary session (Moderator:  Louise Jackson, UC Davis)
In preparation for the conference statement, very brief (2-3 minute) summaries of the research scope and gaps from the co-leader of each parallel science session in Theme 2.

6:30pm – 8:30 pm: Poster session and Reception

March 22, Friday

8:30 am: Distribution of paper copies of the draft of the conference statement at the entrance and information booth of the UC Davis Conference Center

XI. Special Sessions: Putting science into practice

8:30 am – 10:00 am: Parallel sessions, UC Davis Conference Center

  • Synergies between adaptation and mitigation at landscape scale, organized by Emmanuel Torquebiau (CIRAD), Celia Harvey (Conservation International, Landscapes for People, Food and Nature Initiative) and Peter Minang (World Agroforestry)
    • Emmanuel Torquebiau (CIRAD): Introduction
    • Celia Harvey (Conservation International, Landscapes for People, Food and Nature Initiative): Opportunities and challenges for integrating adaptation and mitigation in tropical agricultural landscapes
    • Series of 3 short case-studies (including questions):
      • “Does conservation agriculture contribute to synergy?" by Pablo Tittonell (Wageningen University)
      • “Some soil processes that confer adaptation-mitigation synergy” by Jean Luc Chotte (IRD)
      • “Synergies between climate change mitigation and adaptation through Agroforestry” by Peter A Minang (World Agraforestry)
    • Open discussion, facilitated by Emmanuel Torquebiau (CIRAD)

  • Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS): Science into practice http://ccafs.cgiar.org/
    • Patti Kristjanson (World Agraforestry): Linking knowledge to action: principles and practice
    • Arame Tall (ICRISAT): Empowering farmers to confront climate risks: the case for climate information services. Lessons from Africa and South Asia
    • Mariana Rufino (ILRI): Identifying pro-poor mitigation options for smallholder agriculture in the developing world: a multi-criteria and across-scales assessment
    • Doug Beare (WorldFish): Challenges of gender mainstreamed analyses and development interventions in the Bangladesh delta landscape
    • Responses and discussion

  • FAO and IFAD work on Climate Smart Agriculture: recent experience and lessons learned http://www.fao.org/climatechange/climatesmart/en/
    • Andrea Cattaneo and Aslihan Arslan (FAO-ESA): ES work on CSA; Ongoing CSA project experience in setting up comprehensive CSA policy approaches in project countries (Malawi, Zambia and Vietnam) that bring strong evidence base to agricultural policy making
    • MarjaLiisa TapioBistrom (FAO-NRC): Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Program; Improving efficiency – Lessons from climate smart practices in a small holder milk production project in Western Kenya
    • Lucia Palombi (FAO-NRC): CSA Sourcebook and other practical tools and methodologies; The important role the sourcebook plays in highlighting FAO’s role as a knowledge based organization in bringing science into practice; and an overview of tools and methodologies developed by FAO to assist the practice of CSA on the ground
    • Gernot Laganda (IFAD): IFAD Adaptation for Smallholder Agriculture Program (ASAP); Integrating climate risk resilience and climate-smart practices into IFAD operations

  • AgMIP: a distributed climate-scenario simulation exercise with participation of multiple crop and agricultural economics modeling groups around the world http://www.agmip.org/
    • James W. Jones (University of Florida): Overview
    • John Antle (Oregon State University): Regional integrated assessments
    • Jerry Hatfield (USDA Agricultural Research Service): Carbon/Temperature/Water model improvement
    • Cynthia Rosenzweig (NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University): Global assessments
    • Carolyn Mutter (Columbia University): Capacity building
    • All: Wrap-up and plans

10:00 am – 10:30 am: Break

XII. Comments on the Conference Statement

10:30 am – 12:00 pm: Plenary session (Moderators: Conference Organizing Committee members), Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts

Presentation of the draft conference statement for the knowledge and action outcomes of the conference, followed by requests for comments on the document, responses from the parallel science session co-leaders, and suggestions for changes to improve the text.

Further discussion on a set of proposed coordinated activities, targeted invitations for collaborations that will lead to scientific advances along with impact at multiple scales, and funding opportunities. 

XIII. Science-Policy Planning

12:00 pm – 12:30 pm: Plenary session (Introduction: TBD), 

  • Joseph Alcamo (Chief Scientist, United Nations Environment Programme): Strengthening the Ecological Basis of Food Security  

12:30 pm – 2:00 pm: Lunch

XIV. Closing Panel Reflections and Summation 

2:00 pm – 3:45 pm: Plenary session (Introduction by Jan Hopmans, UC Davis),  Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts

Panel reflections on conference (including participant questions and comments)

  • Patrick Caron (CIRAD): Panel chair
  • Lini Wollenberg (University of Vermont/CCAFS)
  • Rose Emma M. Entsua-Mensah (CSIR Ghana)
  • Hans Hoogeveen (Agro Department Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs)
  • Leslie Lipper (FAO)

What are the key research (gaps and new initiatives) and policy messages from the conference? What steps will allow for greater coordination amongst the climate science community, for funders of climate-smart agriculture and for policy-makers seeking to use new knowledge systems and technology? Interaction with the audience to highlight the  successes, shortcomings, future research needs, and policy imperatives.

3:15 pm: Summary statement by Patrick Caron (CIRAD)

3:30 pm: Closing remarks by Linda Katehi (Chancellor, UC Davis)

3:45 pm: Meeting ends

XIII. Science-Policy Planning

12:00 pm – 12:30 pm: Plenary session (Introduction: TBD)

Joseph Alcamo (Chief Scientist, United Nations Environmental Program): Food crises and resilience to extreme events: strategies and coordinated national responses

XIII. Science-Policy Planning

12:00 pm – 12:30 pm: Plenary session (Introduction: TBD)

Joseph Alcamo (Chief Scientist, United Nations Environmental Program): Food crises and resilience to extreme events: strategies and coordinated national responses

March 23: Field Trip on Saturday

8:30 am – 1:30 pm: Visits to the University of California at Davis’ West Village and its Russell Ranch agricultural facility, and visits to two large, diversified and progressive farms.